Plain Huel + miso = success


#1

I tried the savory recipe that was written on one of the inserts I received - I think it involved a vegetable bouillon cube (I used Marmite instead) and peanut butter, and that was pretty darn good. So I thought, why not try miso? I have to say that works out well. For those who like savory Huel, give it a go.


#2

Personally, I might not be brave enough to try that just yet. However, @Deron and his love for peanut butter might! Also, here’s a few savory ideas for you, @Sabra_Ewing!


#3

I use the unflavored won to make soups all the time. It is great. I was also thinking of making a pizza dough out of it. The only problem is that if it is not in a soup, the earthy flavor can be a bit strong, and I don’t know how to cut through it. Well, they are more like a savory oatmeal. All you do is just make chicken broth from sodium free Bouillon or chicken stock concentrate. If you have homemade on hand, you can use that as well, or you can buy it in the can, but if you were eating this a lot and trying to save money, that is going to be pricy. If you are vegan, then you can just do the same thing, except make vegetable broth. So you make up the broth, and you add in place of the water to make it very thick like an oatmeal. This will be about 2 cups. The instructions are a bit inaccurate when you add it to the shaker when it says to add 14 ounces of water, shake it, and then add 10 ounces of water. What they really mean is add water until it reaches the 25 ounce Mark. Because the powder absorbs so much water, you are actually adding more because there is an amount of time when you were adding water, but the ounces aren’t going up. That is why about 2 cups is what you add. When you drink it from the shaker, you may actually be drinking about 3 cups of water although you did not think you added that much. That is completely fine because you need the water anyways. I was just pointing that out. But anyways, you do about three scoops of Huel with 2 cups of broth. When you make the broth, you can make it extra strong like if it says due one packet per cup, due three packets for 2 cups. Then mix in an egg, add some cheese if you wish, and definitely add seasonings because if you don’t, it will be a bit bland. Then, heat it up. Yes, this is perfectly safe because it is actually fine to cook eggs in the microwave. I used to do it all the time. You can actually make scrambled eggs in the microwave and the egg does Cook. You could replace the egg with some dairy free yogurt or milk. You can also just leave it out. It is very handy to make for work as well if you eat lunch at an office because you can just keep in the fridge and heat up. You can also add water to the vanilla one and turn it into a breakfast oatmeal and add dried fruit or a little bit of butter or whatever. I don’t think there has been any testing to prove what microwaving it does to the nutrition, but I think it is fine because research on other foods show minimal losses when compared to Bacon. Further, they seem to add extra vitamins and minerals, so I think it would be OK.

Sabra Ewing


#4

We have a pizza crust recipe for you! This is a recipe I’ve been dying to try, so you have to tell me how it goes if you make it. :yum: my.huel.com/pizza


#5

OK. I will try it later on when I get some stuff to make pizza.

Sabra Ewing


#6

Interesting culinary adventures! Huel soup, eh? I bet it is good. Let me just ask you this: do you think putting Huel into your soups enhances the flavor? Or is it primarily a way to boost the nutritional value of your soups? Or maybe this is more a way of adding a couple of things to your Huel to make it more interesting, and to make it a soup? Thanks! :yum:


#7

I don’t really think that it boosts the flavor. The flavor of the unflavored one is kind of bland. However, it makes it so that I can have a soup as a complete meal and be completely full from it, when normally a soup is just a starter. I might eat more calories if I had a soup and was not full from it, and then I ate more. I have also been adding lemon juice, and sometimes a pinch of salt to the vanilla one because that does a lot to get rid of that bitter aftertaste. If you add something that includes fat like milk or fish oil, that will completely get rid of that aftertaste in combination with the lemon juice and a pinch of salt, but that also adds more calories. Further, vitamin C is the main nutrient that is going to be lost if you do anything to it like heating it or baking it, and I think that adding some lemon juice can counteract it. Plenty of people are saying that they flavor their own instead of using the flavor boosts, and at first, that made sense to me. I thought, I want a berry flavor, so I am going to use my own berries and do that, but I had to use two scoops of Huel with A cup and a half of berries. I tried three scoops with a cup and I could not taste them at all. Further, I had to pop each Barry out of the skin one by one because the skins will add more bitterness to the shake, especially if you let it sit overnight. I made that mistake with my first one is not removing the skins. That is why when wine is made, the grape skins will be removed, and only some might be added back in a controlled way. Your hands will get stained too. So for three scoops, I would have to use 2 1/4 cups. That will also add a lot of calories. Plus, it gets very thick, and you have to add more water and it is hard without a blender. Are used a technique called maceration for my fruit since I don’t have a blender where you mash it all up with a fork, you add lemon juice, and you let it just soften. For my first one, I thought maybe I can’t taste it because it was not thoroughly mixed in, but when I was finished, no fruit was left. Also, people say they don’t want the chocolate boost because it is just cocoa powder, but I’m not sure. You only have to add a small amount of it to each shake, but with regular cocoa powder, you need to add around 2 tablespoons before you can taste it. Plus, it is not a powder, so you really can’t take it with you. I like fruit, and would rather eat it on its own instead of being forced to use it to flavor my shakes, so I am getting some flavor boosts.

Sabra Ewing


#8

Wow, you are doing some interesting things. I don’t think I want to go as far out on the limb as you. I have decided to steer clear of the vanilla. I simply despise artificial sweetener. Why not sell it unsweetened? Then people can add a little sugar or fake sugar if they want to.

Thanks for the info re the vitamin C content dropping if you cook it and adding some fat if you want to remove bitterness. I didn’t know those things.

Re berries. Why the heck would you want to peel individual berries? If you are going to that much trouble then you may as well cook up a real meal. For me one of the big attractions of instant fuel foods is the time saving factor. I agree that Huel dominates fruit, kicks its butt good. You need to add a lot of fruit. You could add artificial fruit flavor, like the ones made by Lorann - those are OK - nothing to get excited over, but OK… Also, I found some powdered all natural raspberry online and used that, but again, you need a lot of it. That is fine, I can eat fruit some other time.

And I agree with the chocolate critics. Why not just add some cocoa powder instead of paying $10 for a little bag of chocolate flavor.

Happy new year


#9

You should try adding some mushroom powder. I’m going to try that probably.


#10

I would be annoyed if they sold it unsweetened because adding Splenda would just be one more thing I would have to do. Also, I have tried sweetening the original, and it takes about five or six packets of Splenda to do that.

Sabra Ewing


#11

Mushroom powder . . . hmm. The only mushroom powder I know is powdered shitake who hangs out at Asian food shops. You are into the Huel stew thing. Interesting. I would like to try that someday, but it is a defeats-the-purpose scenario. If I wanted to cook, then I would cook, and not make Huel.


#12

Add Splenda? Blekh! Add sugar. Or brown sugar. Or maple syrup.

Btw I like your name. You sound like a character from the Hunger Games. Or maybe Game of Thrones. (-;


#13

Thank you. This is my actual name. As far as cooking, I don’t want to cook, but I also want something savory, which is why I do this soup. If I just do one of those instant soup packets, it is not very filling. If I do a can of soup, that is also not very filling. I would need two or three cans of soup in order to be full, and out around a dollar I can, that would be three dollars a meal, so I drastically lower my cost by using Huel. I have tried all different types of canned soup’s like the canned chili, SpaghettiOs, and Beefaroni I like them in terms of taste, but I don’t get full off them. Plus, I am trying to limit sugar and simple carbohydrates because of insulin resistance. The cards in Huel are fine because they are complex, and it also has enough fiber so it doesn’t all go into my bloodstream at once. I also like the instant packs of Asian soup’s, but that is basically just liquid. You can make this soups in the microwave, or in a shaker as long as you are careful, and even though the texture is a bit different, it is way more filling, and you only have to eat one serving to get full. It feels kind of like oatmeal, but it tastes like soup. You don’t have to cook it over the stove and have a lot of dishes to clean up or anything like that. With some of these, you can even have them cold. I found mushroom powder on Amazon, but I decided not to do it because mushroom powder is actually really expensive.

Sabra Ewing


#14

I find it a little odd that you don’t feel full after eating soup. Don’t you have some bread with it, or a side of potatoes, or buckwheat kasha, or something? But instant soup and canned soup? Not for me. Why not make soup from scratch? It is not difficult and it usually tastes good! Seriously, I have found you can put almost anything savory into a soup, along with salt and pepper, and it will probably turn out OK. Soup/stew is the most forgiving dish of all. I would be interested in trying out Huel as an ingredient in soup, to boost the texture and nutritional value, althou that has the defeats the purpose thing I mentioned before. Does it come out a little gritty or sandy, like it does in the shakes?